The Westin Los Angeles

How you can tell it’s fall in L.A., according to a guy from Vermont L.A.’s rainy season usually ends on Labor Day, but that day has come and gone, leaving a blanket of moisture…

The Westin Los Angeles

How you can tell it’s fall in L.A., according to a guy from Vermont

L.A.’s rainy season usually ends on Labor Day, but that day has come and gone, leaving a blanket of moisture on the ground as the sun fades toward a November chill. The humidity has risen to a high of 87 percent, making it almost impossible to keep our eyes open.

But the weather wasn’t the only thing that was different on our last day of fall. Our guest-house, and the city too, was now draped in white. It was the perfect place to take a walk at night in Los Angeles, and in the early morning, we got a chance to walk a different city. When we arrived at our destination, we didn’t know what to expect. We had no idea if it would take us to a different city entirely, or if it would give us a new insight into L.A. We couldn’t have asked for any better than this.

Tired and hungry, we walked from downtown down to Robertson Blvd., the busy thoroughfare that runs through the historic Arts District. We looked down Robertson to the traffic in front of our building, and found that it had changed from what it hadn’t been days earlier. Now, Robertson was lined with people, some still coming home from work, others headed to the nearby shops, but many more stopping to look up at the sky. The sky was dark, the sun barely visible behind the clouds hovering high above. The rain had brought with it the first true fall chill of the Los Angeles season.

Our guest-house, the Westin Los Angeles, had been lit up for Christmas. On the wall were the familiar Christmas-tree images that adorn many guest-house walls, with reindeer decorating the lobby, and pine trees and snowflakes on the ceiling. Now, it was the only building in the city that was lit up. It was obvious to us that L.A. was finally starting

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